The George Jones Memorial Farm and Nature Preserve
The George Jones Memorial Farm and Nature Preserve
Details
Commenced:
01/02/2017
Submitted:
09/02/2017
Last updated:
09/02/2017
Location:
44333 State Route 511, Oberlin, Ohio, US
Phone:
4254433791
Website:
https://cityfresh.org/?page_id=2854
Climate zone:
Cold Temperate





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The George Jones Memorial Farm and Nature Preserve

Project Type

Urban, Rural, Commercial, Educational

Project Summary

The George Jones Farm is a 70 acre farmstead owned by Oberlin College and leased by the New Agrarian Center (NAC) as a cooperative farm incubator and educational center.

Project Description

At the crossroads of organic food, environmental restoration, and social justice, the 70-acre George Jones Memorial Farm and Nature Preserve is a vibrant space for students and the community to come together to create a sustainable food system for Northeast Ohio and beyond. Oberlin College leases the Jones Farm to the New Agrarian Center (NAC), a nonprofit organization. NAC is housed at and operates the farm along with an innovative Community Supported Agriculture model called City Fresh. A combination of Oberlin students, faculty, alumni, and community members started NAC, the Jones Farm, and City Fresh. Located just one mile from campus, the George Jones Memorial Farm is an innovative educational site with an abundance of resources and activities for students and the greater community. Named after beloved Oberlin College botanist George Jones, the farm is a haven for native plants. With a focus on restoration agriculture, techniques used here help build soil and create healthier, more nutritious crops. The farm partners with Oberlin College to accept food waste from campus dining halls, while providing local food back to students. The farm uses conventional organic and inventive methods for cultivation. Along with annual row crops, the farm has incorporated perennial systems, high tunnel hoop houses, rotational systems, fruit and nut cultivation, and sugar maple production. Many avenues for learning are open to students who desire to work with farm staff. The Nature Preserve offers a wide range of ecosystems to explore and study. The preserve is accessible through interpretive trails (hiking, snow shoeing, cross-country skiing, horse) that pass through wetlands, forests, prairies, vernal pools, and ponds. An abundance of wildlife lives or passes through the property, allowing ample bird watching, animal tracking, and native plant appreciation. On the farm’s south side, Oberlin College has installed a series of research ponds, designed to understand wetland restoration for Ohio ecosystems.

Updates

Courses Taught Here!
Project Badges
Urban Rural Commercial Educational
Administrators
Brad Charles Melzer - Admin
Team Members

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