Logo primary
Logo secondary
Nick Huggins 's Profile
Nick Huggins
Details
Joined:
02/02/2011
Last Updated:
09/02/2011
Location:
Tarago , New South Wales, Australia
Climate Zone:
Cool Temperate
Gender:
Male





My Projects

(projects i'm involved in)

Pinnacle Creek Farms

Pinnacle Creek Farms

Wagga Wagga, AU

Jacmarall Farm

Jacmarall Farm

Tarago, AU


Projects

(projects i'm following)

Zaytuna Farm, The home of the permaculture Research Institute   Milkwood Southern Beaches Community Garden Pinnacle Creek Farms Mexico Corn - Demonstrating a Soil Microbiological Approach Permablitz Gold Coast Kendall Permaculture Farm Permaculture Noosa Purple Pear Farm Permaculture Gold Coast Ashmore Community Garden Permaculture at the Botanic Gardens Kamiah Permaculture Institute Istituto italiano di permacultura Permaculture College Australia Brogo Permaculture Gardens Jacmarall Farm Grasslands, LLC Make-It-Do Farm Terra Perma Perth - Education, Consultation and Design The Permaculture Research Institute of Hellas (Greece) Bozo land The Transformation of Our Urban Home Mudlark Permaculture Tiger Hill Permaculture Terre & Vie Dehesa Felix
Followers
Following
Adam Al-Jamal Adam Grubb Adam Woodman Adrian Baiada Alex Vincent Allen Bundock Amber Armstrong Andy Murray Berber van Beek Bill Mollison Blake Hudson bob tatnell Brendon Farlow Bronwyn White Bruce brucezell@gmail.com Bruce Molloy Byron Joel Carly Gillham Carsten Luedemann Cecilia Macaulay Charles Hamilton Chris Curtis Chris  Partridge Christopher Darker Connor Jones Costa Georgiadis Craig Gallagher Dan Harris-Pascal Dan Palmer Danial Lawton Daniel Bovalino Daniel  Parra Hensel Danielle Marsden-Ballard Darren J.  Doherty David Johnson Deniz Ucok Elaine Codling Elena Parmiggiani Eliza Pearson Else Kennedy Eri Ideta Eric Broberg Ethan Roland Evan Young Federico Lavarias Frank Gapinski Geoff Lawton Gordon Williams Grifen Hope Helene von Roda view all(124)

Back to Nick Huggins's profile

Looking At The Urban Permaculture Landscape Design Course

Posted by Nick Huggins over 11 years ago

A PREVIEW OF WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT FROM OUR UP COMING COURSE AT THE PRI.

In June, students underwent the PRI’s first Urban Landscape Design Course which aimed at formulating the skills required to successfully transfer the theoretical knowledge of Permaculture into a professional, efficient and effective small business operation. The course was an intensive 5-day, 12hr per day immersion into the world of professional consultancy and project management. The course offered students hands-on experience with a design project, building skills that can be translated into other areas such as aid work or paid work in either urban or rural environments, or even taking away the practical experience to better develop your own place.

 WATCH OUR YOUTUBE MOVIE OF THE COURSE IN ACTION..... < HERE!!!

One of the biggest opportunities that presents itself in this field is the capacity for the expansion of Permaculture based knowledge into the professional arena. Teaching students how to make the transition between understanding the concepts of Permaculture design and implementing these concepts into the actual world, where proficiency in organisation, planning, communication and resource management are essential, was the central objective of the course.

Over the five days students were engaged into a real life consultancy and construction project at the Arts Factory in Byron Bay — the backpacker’s institution famous for being the place to chill out and relax, gathering travelers together from all around the globe for over 35 years. Byron Bay has several beaches which are popular for surfing and is popular with both domestic and international tourists. It’s a Mecca for backpackers, who travel along the Australian coast, enjoying the wonderful scenery and outdoor activities on offer, such as sky diving, offshore fishing and magical beaches. The area is also noted for its wildlife, with the whale watching industry a significant contributor to the local economy.


Arts Factory Backpackers Lodge, Byron Bay

Thousands of backpackers pass through the Arts Factory each year, so what better spot to establish a food garden and teach prospective Permaculture students how to grow their own food and establish themselves as more conscious and ethical members of our global community. And, like most people traveling on a budget, money must be spent wisely so each guest staying at the factory now has the opportunity to get involved with propagation and maintenance in direct exchange for the fresh, nutrient-densechemical-free food flourishing right out of the garden beds. What better way to satisfy the soul of a weary earth explorer?!

Each guest staying at the Arts Factory has been contributing $1 per stay to an eco-fund which helped pay for all the materials and plants for the garden. PRI Staff and students contributed time to learn the art of project management and Permaculture garden installation first hand.

The design for the kitchen garden was created during the last PRI internship and combined a series of raised garden beds, a small intensive fruit forest, herb spiral, food tower and even a lovely little picnic table area where you can hang out and enjoy a cup of hot lemon grass tea cut right from within hand’s reach!

A large part of the design philosophy was for us to start looking more consciously at the way we source our food. By producing more food on site we are able to not only produce more vital and healthy fare, but also dramatically decrease costs of production and supply, eliminating the need for transport and other unnecessary waste of valuable resources.

After visiting the site on the first day to survey the scene, the class looked at what would be the most important information to include in the design portfolio document that is presented to the client. Like all good communication this document is to inform, instruct and guide the client through the creation of the garden and its evolution, providing specific information about each element of the design including climate and zone analysis, water, energy and waste systems, composting and worm farm, plant lists and maintenance. A detailed graphic illustration was then produced to provide the visual picture of the master plan, which provides both the client and the crack team of students with a clear vision of what needs to be achieved.

Back in the classroom, we began focusing more closely on small business planning and management, looking at marketing, networking, determination of costs and the specific process involved in undergoing a Permaculture consultancy.

We really broke down what it means to be a consultant, pulled it apart and looked at things like how to make first contact with the client, what kind of questions to ask in order to obtain the essentials before setting foot on site, assembling quotes for consultations, design elements, garden construction and other necessary considerations.

The question that 95% of the students had was “How do you know what to charge and what things cost?” This is where we spent a lot of time breaking down what will be done during the installation, making profit estimations, time management analysis, specific material identification and allocation of resources. This type of analysis goes for all aspects of the course, with students breaking down each element to determine its true value.

The remaining two and a half days were spent getting our hands dirty — yes, even me.

The first task on-site was to setup an effective work process with the students and put a structure in place. A designer was appointed, who was responsible for taking the design from paper to practice, instructing the project manager on general design elements and layout and making smart choices on the run if the design doesn’t go exactly according to plan. The designer is also responsible for all interaction and communication with the client. The Project Manager (PM) is responsible for overseeing the construction of the garden and scheduling specific work tasks. Whether in Aid work or pAid work, time is money and the budget must be kept in check. The PM is responsible for delegating tasks to the foreperson of each work task and ensuring that tasks are being completed efficiently and to satisfactory standards. The foreperson (FP) is responsible for managing small intensive teams of workers who provide the labour to construct the garden.

With all that said and done I could get on with the some dirty work of laboring for 2.5 days, talking with students and taking a real interest in their life so as to provide specific advice to their ambitions. Whilst it was bloody hard work, the installation is more of a social experiment on how people can work together and get positive outcomes in an organised working environment.

On the last day we had Brisbane Permaculture designer and businessman Tim Auld from allyoucaneatgardens.com.au come along. Tim gave the students an interesting talk on the evolution of his business and what his experiences have been since starting.

Five days passes by quick and we packed a lot in. Students walked away with the necessary tools to start their own business the following Monday, receiving a full colour design presentation and plan of the project completed during the week to use as an example of their experience for future projects. They had hands on experience with the garden installation, compiling quotes for consultations, designs and implementation and a treasure trove of computer files specific to Permaculture business operations, with templates to hit the ground running and be quoting straight away.

Talking & teaching Permaculture business is my passion, touching base with students long after the course has finished to keep the network and support together. We all need that network and support to keep us, even me, focused on our goals and tasks at hand.

If you’re serious about a career in Permaculture business, then signing up for the October 31st 2011 Urban Permaculture Landscape Design Course at the PRI is a must.

We can tip the balance and really make a difference in people’s lives by teaching them how to live within their means and increasing the health of their families by growing their own nutrient-dense, chemical-free food with your professional guidance.

It really pains me to talk with Permaculturalist that tell me they have to go and work forMonsanto during the week to pay for their Permaculture lifestyle. How is that sustainable? Sounds more like a hobby to me, not a lifestyle. I know I keep ranting about this in different articles I have written, but let’s make a choice. There are, give or take, 6,981,372,139 people in the world as I type this. Can we say there is not enough work to go around?

 

Comments (2)

You must be logged in to comment.

Mark Brown
Mark Brown : wow
Posted over 11 years ago

Report Mark Brown on Looking At The Urban Permaculture Landscape Design Course

Reason:

or cancel

Blake Hudson
Blake Hudson : Look forward to meeting you on the 31st Nick! Im really looking forward to the course, i know it will kick-start my PC biz into gear!! cheers...
Posted over 11 years ago

Report Blake Hudson on Looking At The Urban Permaculture Landscape Design Course

Reason:

or cancel

My Badges
Consultant Pdc teacher I'm male, single, and looking for a permaculture partner
My Permaculture Qualifications
Other course verified
Internship
Type: Internship
Teacher: Geoff Lawton
Location: Zaytuna Farm
Date: Jan 2010
Other course verified
Earthworks Course
Type: Earthworks
Teacher: Geoff Lawton
Location: Zaytuna Farm
Date: Jan 2010
Other course verified
Aid Worker Course
Type: Aid Worker
Teacher: Geoff Lawton
Location: Zaytuna farm
Date: Mar 2010
Other course verified
Permaculture Design Teacher Training Course
Type: Teacher Training
Teacher: Geoff Lawton
Location: Zaytuna Farm
Date: Mar 2010
Other course unverified
Diploma Horticulture
Type: Gardening
Teacher: John O'Donohue
Location: Australian Institute of Horticulture
Date: Oct 2001
Other course unverified
Certificate III Landscape Design
Type: Gardening
Teacher: John O'Donohue
Location: Australian Institute of Horticulture
Date: Feb 1999
Pri verified
Permaculture Design Course
Type: Permaculture Design Certificate (PDC) course
Verifying teacher: Geoff Lawton
Other Teachers: Peter Brecknock
Location: Zaytuna Farm
Date: Nov 2009
Other course verified
Keyline Design Course
Type: Other
Teacher: Darren J. Doherty
Location: Milkwood Permaculture
Date: Oct 2010
Other course verified
RegenAg Local Farms & Community
Type: Other
Verifying teacher: Nick Ritar
Other Teachers: Joel Salatin
Location: Mulloon Creek - Natural Farms
Date: Nov 2010
Other course verified
Soil Biology / Compost Course
Type: Soil Biology/Compost
Teacher: Paul Taylor
Location: Zaytuna Farm
Date: Feb 2010
Other course verified
Holistic Management
Type: Other
Teacher: George Gundry
Location: Tarago NSW
Date: Feb 2012
5 PDC Graduates (list)
0 PRI PDC Graduates (list)
46 Other Course Graduates (list)
have acknowledged being taught by Nick Huggins
1 have not yet been verified (list)
Climate Zones
Nick Huggins has permaculture experience in:
Cold Temperate
Cool Temperate
Warm Temperate
Mediterranean
Island
Sub tropical
Dry Tropical
Cold Desert

Report Nick Huggins

Reason:

or cancel

Hide Nick Huggins

Reason:

or cancel

Hide Looking At The Urban Permaculture Landscape Design Course

Reason:

or cancel

Report Looking At The Urban Permaculture Landscape Design Course

Reason:

or cancel